Theatre Reviews

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“A special mention must go out to Celia Learmonth who opens the show with her convincing witching and child-like mannerisms and transforms into Macduff, with an incredible switch to masculine movements and a powerful change in voice.”

 Bibi Lucille, London Theatre Reviews

“There’s a standout performance from London-born Celia Learmonth who plays the Second Witch and Macduff. She tackles the roles with passion and vigour and really brings the characters she plays to life.”

Sarah Galloway, Everything Theatre 

“New Girl Ness/Venus (Celia Learmonth) develops a crush on Aidan/Adonis (Hylton West), amidst merciless teasing by colleagues. The lovers’ chemistry is immediately palpable, both actors delivering sensitive and muscular performances.”

“The Prickle”, Smart Arts Review 

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“Celia Learmonth played not only the role of a malevolent witch but also a charismatic Macduff. She created a robust, furious character ignited by revenge and the auditorium was lit up with Macduff’s anger and hate.”

Susan Stanley-Carroll 

“Celia Learmonth did a fine job as a grief-stricken Macduff

Chris Lilly, London Pub Theatres Magazine

“But the star is Celia Learmonth; her Eliza Doolittle is magnificent. Eliza’s changing mannerisms and phonetics are played equally well and the change in her personality is absolutely convincing.”

Michael Stephenson, London Theatre 1

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“Tower newcomer Celia Learmonth was a delight as the downtrodden girl turned independent woman and the subtle developments in her performance showed a real flair for character nuance. Her comic timing in what I shall call the tea party scene (even if there was no tea in evidence) was spot on and it is a testament to her engagement with the audience that “Not bloody likely!” still drew a small gasp in times when we are used to infinitely worse language.”

John Chapman, 2nd From Bottom

Celia Learmonth is also superb as Eliza, moving from feral, to submissive, before ending the play firmly in control.”

Matthew Partridge, The Remote Goat